Posts Tagged ‘warblers’

Warblers, warblers, and more warblers!

Saturday, April 13th, 2013

This supplemental post is dedicated entirely to the warbler migration through the Dry Tortugas National Park, which is one of the most spectacular in the country!

Warbler species seen this migration:

Palm

Prairie

Yellow-rumped

ovenbird

American redstart

Louisiana waterthrush

Northern waterthrush

black-and-white

blackpoll

Northern parula

worm-eating

blue-winged

prothonotary

hooded

yellow-throated

Enjoy the photos I’ve added of regular migrants seen in the last two weeks:

Profile of a blue-winged warbler in the parade ground.

Profile of a blue-winged warbler in the parade ground.

The blue-winged warbler was a particular favorite of mine, and is a less common visitor to the Dry Tortugas.

Female American redstart. No male observed yet.

Female American redstart. No male observed yet.

Worm-eating warbler foraging on a buttonwood tree in parade ground.

Worm-eating warbler foraging on a buttonwood tree in parade ground.

Pale palm warbler not quite in full breeding plumage.

Pale palm warbler not quite in full breeding plumage.

Look for the constant tail-bobbing of this funny little warbler, and note that they hang out in large groups and can be seen out in the open in the grass.

Northern waterthrush foraging in the camp site area leaf litter.

Northern waterthrush foraging in the camp site area leaf litter.

The waterthrushes, ovenbirds, worm-eating, and Swainson’s warblers all have similar feeding techniques: rustling through leaf litter on the ground under trees to turn up insects and larvae.

Black-and-white warbler in the parade ground.

Black-and-white warbler in the parade ground.

Blackpoll warbler in the parade ground.

Blackpoll warbler in the parade ground.

Beautiful northern parula on the heli-pad by the south beach.

Beautiful northern parula on the heli-pad by the south beach.

These multi-colored beauties are not shy of people and are not afraid to hop down to a low branch and sing right in front of you.

Male hooded warbler on the south helipad.

Male hooded warbler on the south helipad.

Female hooded warbler foraging in the parade ground.

Female hooded warbler foraging in the parade ground.

These are mostly early migrants, but the two later species yet to be seen at the Park include the Swainson’s warbler and black-throated blue warbler.

Happy birding!

–Chelsea B.

 

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